'One baby per hour' born already in withdrawal

‘One baby per hour’ born already in withdrawal

This article was forwarded to me by a friend asking for solutions to this fast evolving epidemic.

Pain Killers

Pain Killers

This was a recent blog post on CNN.Com At the bottom the article, I’m going to give some information to detox before pregnancy. Keep in mind, I always encourage my clients to communicate with their doctors before doing the Alpha Reset or any of our other programs.

The cry of a baby withdrawing from prescription opiates is shrill, as if the child is in terrible pain.

“It’s a very high-pitched, uncomfortable cry,” said Dr. Aimee Bohn, a pediatrician with Mountain Comprehensive Health Corporation in Whitesburg, Kentucky.  “It’s like the kid has been pinched.”

That characteristic cry is increasingly ringing through the hallways of hospitals nationwide, according to new research.

By 2009 there were more than 13,000 babies born with neonatal abstinence syndrome, a withdrawal syndrome that occurs in some babies after being exposed to a class of painkillers, called opiates, while in utero, according to the study published Monday.

“That’s about one baby per hour,” said Dr. Stephen Patrick, lead author of the study, which was published online in the Journal of American Medical Association. “We were surprised by it. That’s a startling increase.”

Perhaps more startling – that one baby per hour figure marks about a three-fold increase in the number of babies born with NAS since 2000; and during the same time period, opiate use among expectant mothers was also jumping, increasing nearly five-fold.

“There has been an incredible increase in the number of opiate pain relievers prescribed in the U.S.,” said Patrick, a fellow in the University of Michigan’s Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine. “We think that might be part of the increase we are seeing.”

Patrick says he undertook the study after he and colleagues from other hospitals began noticing more and more babies in their neonatal intensive care units with hallmarks of NAS, which includes increased irritability, respiratory and feeding problems, low birth weight and, rarely, seizures.

Using hospital billing data from the Kids’ Inpatient Database, they identified which newborns were discharged with an NAS diagnosis to arrive at a national estimate.

Bohn says that a couple of years ago, one baby per hour born withdrawing from opiates would have surprised her. Today, she says, it is not surprising based on what she is seeing in eastern Kentucky, part of an area known as “ground zero” of prescription drug abuse.

“Women you would never guess have a problem because they are functioning in society come in addicted,” said Bohn.

Those mothers, said Bohn, are having babies with NAS at a rate of 1-2 cases per week, on a busy month, at her hospital. And that does not include babies who are exposed to prescription painkillers in utero, but somehow escape the overt symptoms at birth.

“A lot of times, the babies are a little jittery, they shake when they first come out,” said Bohn.  “They become cranky, they don’t sleep and they develop terrible diaper rashes.”

Related story: Hospital seeing more babies born exposed to prescription drugs

The average hospital stay for a baby born withdrawing from painkillers is 16 days, according to the JAMA study, and 77% of the time, babies with NAS were charged under state Medicaid programs.

“What we found is that the total U.S. hospital bill quadrupled over the time frame [2000-2009] nearing 720 million dollars,” said Patrick.  “That is extra incentive for state governments to engage in developing solutions to prevent this.”

First off, if you are dealing with pain and are on meds. I’m so sorry to hear you are. The first step is to pray and meditate. Many people feel like they don’t have time and this is often overlooked.

What Are The Best Ways To Detox?

Drink lots of water: with pink salt and lemon in it. This will help flush them out.

Drink juices: You may want to try the Alpha Reset or another fast before you get pregnant. (Start taking care of your body, before you bring another life into the world.) It’s abuse… seriously!)

Exercise: so simple but so many people are lacking at this. Movement is the 3rd most important thing to a human being.

Sauna: (Infrared.) to help “sweat” the chemicals out.

Sleep: Make sure you are coming into alignment with your bodies natural circadian rhythm, this is 10pm to 6pm.

Deep Breathing Techniques: Do yoga or practice breathing deeply throughout the day. Your lungs detox 70% of the toxins in your body.

Find a friend: to support you during your detox. Make sure that friends likes to give out free hugs. (No one does this anymore.) :)

I hope these tips/suggestions help. I’ve had friends and coaching students give up the drugs.

I believe ultimately it comes down to self care. These Moms are searching for something outside of themselves to solve the pain that is going on internally.

The answer is within all of us.

Remember, we’re in this together….

Drew 

Drew Canole

Drew Canole

 

If you’re ready to take the first step, begin your transformation by clicking the transformations below!

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WRITEFORUS

Disclaimer: The techniques, strategies, and suggestions expressed here are intended to be used for educational purposes only. The author, Drew Canole, and the associated www.fitlife.tv are not rendering medical advice, nor to diagnose, prescribe, or treat any disease, condition, illness, or injury.

It is imperative that before beginning any nutrition or exercise program you receive full medical clearance from a licensed physician.

Drew Canole and Fitlife.tv claim no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the material presented here.

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