Dalai Lama: Our Future Is Very Much In Your Hands

make a difference, compassion, our future

 Dalai Lama: Our Future Is Very Much In Your Hands

Written by: Emilyn Gil

I grew up in a little country house with a 2 acre property. When it would rain at night my siblings and I would go outside the next morning and find the sidewalks and driveways covered in earthworms. My dad explained that the flooded grass caused the worms to crawl out of the ground in an effort to stay alive.

But he also showed us that if the worms didn’t make it back to the soil, the sun would dry them up.

We hurried in the early morning to carefully move the worms back onto the grass, but looking out over all the surfaced worms was discouraging for our hopeful eyes. In an effort to lift our spirits, my dad picked up a worm and explained that even though we may not save every worm from the heat of the day, we could at least make a difference to that one.

It worked and we had a lot of fun picking up worm after worm and gently tossing them back to the lawn shouting gleefully, “I made a difference to this one!”

Make A Difference In The World

When I think of the world today, this story comes to mind. There are so many terrible things that happen every day; seeing everything on the news and social media is enough to send anyone back under their covers discouraged. How can your small influence make any difference when there’s so much you can’t do?

The answer is the same. You can make a difference to one person. And then another. And then another. You have a circle of influence that only you can make a change in. If you don’t do it, who will?

Unity In Diversity

One thing that seems to cause a lot of trouble in the world lately is diversity. Diversity is an interesting thing. It makes us unique, makes us interesting, makes us who we are. But too often we tend to focus on our differences as a human race more than on the things that bring us together.

Each one of us is simply one of the 7 billion people in the world. A small part of the whole. We may have different faiths, incomes and races, but we all want a good meal, a safe place to sleep and a happy life for ourselves and our children. The more we can find those similarities we have with others, the faster the barriers between us will disappear.

Find Time For Compassion

Another helpful concept when reaching for unity is compassion. Research has shown that compassion and empathy are instinctive behaviors, while anger and aggression are not. Why then is it so hard at times to react compassionately towards others? It is generally accepted that anger and distrust do not lead you to a happy life while compassion and kindness do. So where is the catch?

An experiment done at the Princeton Seminary explains it clearly. In the experiment a group of students at the seminary were told that they would each be giving a sermon across campus to their supervisors. Some of the students were assigned the topic of the parable of The Good Samaritan, while others were assigned a non related topic. On their way across campus they all passed by a man who was clearly in distress and in need of assistance.

The researchers figured that those who had been contemplating The Good Samaritan would be more likely to stop and help the distressed man. It turned out, however, that the deciding factor of whether or not they stopped to help depended solely upon how much the student felt they were in a hurry.

Too often we feel the need to hurry along in life blinded by our personal agenda. How many people do you “pass” throughout your day without thinking to stop and help, ask how they’re doing, give some advice, or even offer a smile?

Practice Kindness

The world can always use more compassion, more love, more kindness, more of YOU. And there is no better time than today. It all starts within yourself, in your heart and in your mind. Cultivate your compassion and calm your destructive emotions. Better individuals make better communities, which make a better humanity.

So join the cause! Find ONE PERSON every day to show compassion to and watch as the world around you changes.

I know it can be done. One little worm at a time.

 

Emilyn Gil

Emilyn Gil

Emilyn Gil is a 22 year old English Major at UVU. She started writing at age 6, and since then has won several awards including the Scholastic Art and Writing Gold Key and was featured in the Kolob Canyon Review in Cedar City. Aside from the written word, her other passions include performing in the occasional musical theater production, and playing piano, guitar, and ukulele. Some of her favorite pastimes are baking, napping, and spending time with family. She likes monkeys, homemade rolls, and the color yellow. She has traveled to Ecuador, Argentina, Mexico, and Canada, and currently resides in Orem, Utah with her husband Jorge. You can find more of her work online at emilyaddn.blogspot.com or on Instagram at @emilyncan.
Emilyn Gil

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Glenn was in an accident with a hockey puck that made it so his mouth had to be wired shut! While he was going through recovery he found that Organifi Protein sustained him in a healthy way where he was able to maintain his muscle mass while still be able to loose weight.

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