9 Healthy Kale Recipes

kaledrewssexybody (3)Kale is an unassuming leafy green that many people bypass due to its slightly bitter flavor. But if you learn to use it creatively, kale can be quite tasty, which is only one reason to eat this vegetable. In the realm of superfoods, and certainly of green leafy vegetables, kale is king (or close to it!).

One cup of kale contains just around 30 calories but will provide you with seven times the daily recommended amount of vitamin K, twice the amount of vitamin A and a day’s worth of vitamin C, plus much more.

Kale Dubbed the ‘New Beef’

Kale has a 3:1 carbohydrate-to-protein ratio – an exceptionally high amount of protein for any vegetable, and one reason why it has recently been acclaimed as the “new beef.

Surprisingly, like meat, kale contains all nine essential amino acids needed to form the proteins within your body: histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, valine – plus, nine other non-essential ones for a total of 18.

Further, the amino acids in kale are easier to extract by your body compared to those in meat. When consuming a steak, for instance, your body has to expend great metabolic resources to break down the massive, highly complex, and intricately folded protein structures within mammalian flesh back down into their constituent amino acids.

Then, later, these extracted amino acids must be reassembled back into the same, highly complex, intricately folded and refolded human proteins from which your body is made. This is a time-consuming, energy-intensive process, with many metabolic waste products released in the process.

Kale, on the other hand, is easier for your body to use, yet can be considered “meaty” and worthy of being considered as a main course in any meal (and you can try out numerous recipes in which kale is the star player below).

If You Want to Flood Your Body with Antioxidants, Vitamins, and Minerals, You’ll Want to Eat Kale

Many people have difficulty consuming enough vitamins and minerals, but this becomes simple if you eat kale regularly. Most notably, one cup of kale contains over 10,000 IUs of vitamin A, most of which is delivered the form of natural beta-carotene, as well as significant amounts of vitamin K.

And as far as calcium is concerned, one cup of kale will give you 90 milligrams in a highly bioavailable form. One calcium bioavailability study found that calcium from kale was 25% better absorbed than calcium from milk.1

Kale is also an excellent source of magnesium, and as a cruciferous vegetable has many of the same cancer-fighting properties as broccoli, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts. And, kale is loaded with both lutein and zeaxanthin at over 26 mg combined, per serving.

Of all the carotenoids, only zeaxanthin and lutein are found in your retina, which has the highest concentration of fatty acids of any tissue in your body. This is because your retina is a highly light- and oxygen-rich environment, and it needs a large supply of free radical scavengers to prevent oxidative damage there.

Your body concentrates zeaxanthin and lutein in your retina to perform this duty, and consuming these antioxidants may help to ward of eye problems like age-related macular degeneration. What else do you gain when you eat kale?

  • Anti-inflammatory properties that may help prevent arthritis, heart disease, and autoimmune diseases
  • Plant-based omega-3 fats for building cell membranes, protecting against heart disease and stroke, and regulating blood clotting
  • Cancer-fighting sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol
  • An impressive number of beneficial flavonoids, including 32 phenolic compounds and three hydroxycinamic acids to help support healthy cholesterol levels and scavenge free radicals


Curly Kale to Dinosaur Kale: What’s the Difference?

There are multiple varieties of kale, which descended from wild cabbage. The oldest variety is curly kale, which has ruffled leaves, a deep-green color and a bitter, pungent flavor. More “recent” varieties are ornamental kale, Russian, and dinosaur kale, the latter of which has blue-green leaves and a more delicate taste than curly kale.2 Ornamental kale, sometimes called salad savoy, was originally used as a decorative garden plant (it comes in green, white, and purple colors), although it can also be eaten and has a mellow flavor and tender texture.

When choosing kale, look for firm, fresh deeply colored leaves with hardy stems. Avoid leaves that are brown or yellow or that contain holes. Kale with smaller leaves tends to be more tender and milder than larger-leaved kale. Choose organic varieties (or grow your own) and store it in your refrigerator (unwashed) in a plastic storage bag (remove as much air as you can). Ideally, eat kale as soon as you can, because the longer it sits the more bitter the flavor becomes.3

9 Tasty Kale Recipes

If you avoid kale because of its bitter taste, you’ll be pleasantly surprised by the recipes that follow. Posted by Health.com,4 these recipes feature kale in fresh new ways that will tempt your taste buds and, with this much variety, there’s something for everyone.

Make it a goal to make your way through each recipe on this list… and remember to source locally grown organic produce, organic pastured eggs, raw dairy products, and grass-fed meats as much as possible. I also recommend swapping out olive oil for coconut oil in cases where the oil will be heated during cooking.

Two-Bean Soup with Kale
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • ½ cup chopped carrot
  • ½ cup chopped celery
  • ½ teaspoon salt, divided
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 4 cups organic vegetable broth, divided
  • 7 cups stemmed, chopped kale (about 1 bunch)
  • 2 (15-ounce) cans no-salt-added cannellini beans, rinsed, drained, and divided
  • 1 (15-ounce) can no-salt-added black beans, rinsed and drained
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary
  1. Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add olive oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add onion, carrot, and celery, and sauté for 6 minutes or until tender. Stir in ¼ teaspoon salt and garlic; cook for 1 minute. Stir in 3 cups vegetable broth and kale. Bring to a boil; cover, reduce heat, and simmer for 3 minutes or until kale is crisp-tender.
  2. Place half of cannellini beans and remaining 1 cup vegetable broth in a blender or food processor; process until smooth. Add pureed bean mixture, remaining cannellini beans, black beans, and pepper to soup. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, and simmer for 5 minutes. Stir in remaining ¼ teaspoon salt, vinegar, and rosemary.

Raw Kale, Grapefruit, and Toasted Hazelnut Salad
  • 2 pink grapefruits
  • ½ small red onion, thinly sliced, divided
  • ¼ cup fresh lemon juice
  • ½ cup fat-free plain yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • 8 ounces lacinato kale, very thinly sliced, or baby kale leaves
  • 1 ounce toasted hazelnuts, chopped (1/3 cup)
  1. Peel and segment grapefruit; reserve 3 tablespoons of juice in a large bowl. Mince 2 rings onion. Add to grapefruit juice, with lemon juice, yogurt, oil, salt, and pepper. Whisk until well mixed.
  2. Toss in kale. Top with remaining onion, grapefruit, and hazelnuts.

Braised Kale Frittata
  • 6 large organic, pastured eggs
  • 4 large egg whites
  • ¾ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • ½ ounce Gruyère or Parmesan cheese, grated (3 Tbsp.)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped oregano
  • Cooking spray
  • 2 cups Braised Kale without cheese, drained, finely chopped
  • ¾ cup chopped cherry tomatoes
  1. Preheat oven to 375°F. In a large bowl, whisk the first 6 ingredients (through oregano).
  2. Lightly coat an 8-inch ovenproof cast-iron or nonstick skillet with cooking spray. Heat over medium. Add the kale and tomatoes. Cook, stirring, until hot (about 3 minutes). Add the eggs and swirl to distribute.
  3. Transfer to the oven and bake until set and hot (about 20 minutes). Cut in wedges.

Crispy Tamari Kale Chips
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons tamari
  • 2 teaspoons sherry vinegar
  • ½ pound kale, coarse stems removed and leaves torn (about 6 cups)
  • 2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  1. Preheat oven to 425°.
  2. Combine 2 teaspoons each olive oil, tamari, and sherry vinegar; toss with ½ pound kale, coarse stems removed and leaves torn (about 6 cups).
  3. Divide kale mixture among 2 shallow baking pans; bake until crisp and golden (about 15 minutes), stirring occasionally.
  4. Sprinkle with 2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese.

Roasted Squash and Kale Salad
  • 1 butternut squash
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ⅓ teaspoon pepper
  • 1 pound kale, thinly sliced
  • 1 cucumber, peeled and julienned
  • ¼ cup thinly sliced red onion
  • 2 teaspoons low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons creamy peanut butter
  • 2 teaspoons fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon water
  1. Preheat oven to 400°.
  2. Peel, seed, and cut butternut squash into 1-inch chunks.
  3. Toss with olive oil, brown sugar, salt, and pepper; bake for 25 minutes. Remove from oven; cool.
  4. Toss with kale, cucumber, and red onion.
  5. In a blender, purée low-sodium soy sauce, fresh lime juice, sesame oil, sugar, creamy peanut butter, fresh ginger, and water.
  6. Drizzle salad with dressing; serve.

Barley-Stuffed Poblanos
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 1½ cups barley, soaked overnight and drained
  • 1 bunch kale, thick stems removed, leaves chopped
  • 1⅛ teaspoons chili powder, divided
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 (28-ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes, crushed
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 6 large poblano peppers
  • 2 ounces white cheddar, grated (1/2 cup)
  • 3 slices Monterey Jack cheese, halved
  • ½ cup crumbled queso fresco
  1. In a large saucepan, heat 1 tablespoon oil over medium heat. Add onion and cook until soft (5-7 minutes). Add barley and 3¾ cups water and cook until barley is tender (about 30 minutes). Stir kale and ⅛ teaspoon chili powder into barley until kale is wilted; mix in cheddar.
  2. Meanwhile, in a heavy pot, heat remaining oil over medium heat. Add garlic and cook 3 minutes. Add tomatoes, remaining 1 teaspoon chili powder, and salt; bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until sauce thickens (about 30 minutes). Turn heat to low; cover.
  3. Preheat broiler with rack in middle position. Slice off stems from peppers to make a wide hole for stuffing; reserve stems. Using a small knife, carefully remove membranes and seeds. Stuff peppers tightly with barley mixture; return stem ends to top of peppers. Place in a large, broiler-proof baking dish; broil until peppers are charred and soft (20 minutes), turning once halfway through. Add tomato sauce to pan around peppers; cover each pepper with ½ slice Monterey Jack. Broil until cheese melts (1-2 minutes). Transfer peppers to plates with sauce; top each with 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon queso fresco.

Tuscan Kale with Almonds, Plums, and Goat Cheese
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon tamari or low-sodium soy sauce
  • ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 pound Tuscan Kale, Swiss chard or spinach, tough ribs removed and sliced thin (about 8 cups)
  • ¼ cup sliced seasoned almonds (such as Almond Accents)
  • 2 plums, halved, pitted and cut into wedges
  • 2 ounces crumbled goat cheese
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  1. Whisk together the first 5 ingredients (through olive oil) in a large serving bowl.
  2. Add remaining ingredients to dressing, and toss well to combine.
  3. Divide salad among 4 salad plates, and serve immediately.

Chicken and White Bean Soup with Greens
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1¼ cups thinly sliced leeks, white part only
  • 1 large garlic clove, crushed
  • ½ cup (1/4-inch-thick) slices carrot
  • 6 cups reduced-sodium, fat-free chicken broth
  • 1½ cups skinless, boneless, shredded, rotisserie chicken
  • 1 (2-inch) fresh rosemary sprig
  • 1 (19-ounce) can cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 cup packed roughly chopped fresh kale
  • 1 cup packed baby spinach
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
  1. Heat oil in a stockpot or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add leeks and garlic; cook, stirring occasionally, for 3–4 minutes or until tender but not browned. Add carrots, and cook, stirring for 1 minute. Add broth, chicken, and rosemary; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer for 5 minutes, skimming occasionally.
  2. Add beans and kale, and simmer for about 5 minutes more. Add spinach, and cook for 2–3 minutes more or until tender. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Remove rosemary sprig and garlic clove. Ladle soup into 6 warm bowls; sprinkle each with ½ teaspoon parsley.

Braised Kale
  • 1 large (14-oz) bunch kale
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 8 garlic cloves, chopped
  • ¾ cup lower-sodium chicken broth
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • ¼ ounce grated Parmesan (optional)
  1. Strip the kale leaves from the tough stems. Discard the stems; coarsely chop the leaves. Rinse well in a colander, leaving the water on the leaves.
  2. Heat the oil in a large skillet over low heat. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until it’s golden and aromatic (3-4 minutes). Transfer the garlic to a dish and reserve.
  3. Reheat the oil over medium heat, then add the kale and the broth. Cover and simmer until the kale is tender (3-4 minutes). Season with the salt and pepper. Transfer to a serving platter and top with the garlic and Parmesan, if desired.

Source: Holistic Healthy Living 
Image Source: Health

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alphaaThe detoxification process can also take in the form of a juice fast.  Here at FitLife.TV, we recommend people to try the Alpha Reset (AR)The Alpha Reset is a 5 Day Juice Fast. It is part of the Juice with Drew System. This is the first step in your detoxification process. If you are just starting out with juicing, do not jump right into a juice fast right away. Just try 1 juice per day along with the rest of your nutrition and see how your body responds. If your body responds well to juicing, then ramp up the number of juices per day. These healthy, nutrient-dense juices can replace that coffee you reach for in the morning or that soda in the afternoon. Here are some of our followers that have tried the Alpha Reset!

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lleader_34 (1) transformations_bottom_blog_HERO_-2 Disclaimer: The techniques, strategies, and suggestions expressed here are intended to be used for educational purposes only. The author, Drew Canole, and the associated www.fitlife.tv are not rendering medical advice, nor to diagnose, prescribe, or treat any disease, condition, illness, or injury. It is imperative that before beginning any nutrition or exercise program you receive full medical clearance from a licensed physician. Drew Canole and Fitlife.tv claim no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the material presented here.

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